Module 12 Lesson 2 Mastery Assignment Equilibrium Movie

ASTRO 801: Planets, Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe

This syllabus is divided into several sections. You can read it sequentially by scrolling down the length of the document or by clicking on any of the links below to 'jump' to a specific section. That said, it is essential that you read the entire document, as well as material covered in the course orientation. Together these serve the role of our course "contract."

Instructor

Dr. Christopher Palma
Senior Lecturer and Associate Head for Undergraduate Programs
Department of Astronomy & Astrophysics
The Pennsylvania State University
mailing address:  525 Davey Lab  physical office address:  507 Davey Lab
University Park, PA 16802

  • Phone: (814) 865-2255
  • Fax: (814) 863-3399
  • Email: Please use the course inbox in Canvas
  • Other Connection options: Skype ID chrispalma.psu, FaceTime ID cp4v@mac.com
  • Visit my personal website
  • Office Hours: My best effort office hours are Mondays from 2:30 - 3:30pm and Thursdays from 11:00 - 12:30pm, but I am much more frequently available by email and phone, so don't hesitate to try at other times, too. The reason I say best effort is that every semester I end up having 1 or 2 weeks where something I can't get out of conflicts with my office hours. I will try to give at least a few days notice if I can't be available at those times in a given week. I am a Mac User and would be happy to hold office hours or appointments using FaceTime, Skype or similar text / video chatting software.

Return to top of page

Course Overview

ASTRO 801: PLANETS, STARS, GALAXIES, AND THE UNIVERSE (3 credits). Overview of the structure, formation, and evolution of planets, stars, galaxies, and the universe.
Prerequisites: None

Observations by modern ground-based and space-based observatories have fueled significant changes in our understanding of the Universe. The Solar System contains only 8 planets but has many thousands of Kuiper Belt Objects, including Pluto. Large area sky surveys have taken inventory of the stars in the Milky Way Galaxy and galaxies in the Universe and determined that only 4% of the mass of the universe is found in luminous objects. Besides the mysterious “dark matter,” we now know that the energy budget of the universe is dominated by “dark energy,” which is causing the expansion of the Universe to accelerate. ASTRO 801 is designed specifically for secondary science teachers who seek to enrich their knowledge and bring to their classrooms a contemporary understanding of Earth'’s place in the Universe. ASTRO 801: Planets, Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe will provide you with a strong foundation in astronomy, allowing you to critically evaluate the evidence for the most recent advances in our understanding of the Solar System, our Galaxy, and the Universe.

Astronomers use observations of the light from distant sources to discover the nature of these objects and their environment. ASTRO 801 will lead you to an understanding of light and the instruments for its detection. You will see how careful analysis of these observational data and theoretical models are used to solve the mysteries of the Universe.

ASTRO 801 will combine digital video, audio, simulation models, and the wealth of astronomical imagery from NASA's Hubble, Chandra, and Spitzer Great Observatories. You will use highly detailed planetarium software and simulated observing experiences to directly explore the night sky to make the same observations that research astronomers perform in their work.

There are 12 lessons that will be completed at a rate of approximately 1 week per lesson. ASTRO 801 will be conducted entirely on the World Wide Web. There will be no set class meeting times, but students will be required to complete weekly assignments. Each lesson contains interactive exercises, links, animations, movies, and novel explanations of the basic scientific principles related to the objects in the Universe and their environments. Each lesson will conclude with an open book, online assessment, which will rely on a variety of types of exercises. These exercises will include brief math problems and short essay questions, some of which will require additional Internet research to complete. Several simulated lab exercises will also be required, which will allow the students to enrich their understanding of the concepts through inquiry-based, active learning. Each students will also complete a capstone project, where they will use content knowledge and skills to create material for their classrooms. ASTRO 801 students will be granted licenses to use the courseware developed for this course in their own secondary classrooms.

What I expect of you

I expect that you will treat this course in the same manner you would a credit-bearing, face-to-face section of a Master's level course. You should expect to spend the same amount of time on this course that you would spend in and out of class in your other courses. On average, that may be about eight hours per week. However, you will find your workload depends on your familiarity with the technology needed to take an online course and any past experience you have with the astronomy subject matter.

In my experience, the students who reach their goals in online courses are those who are able to motivate themselves to keep up with the coursework and those who take the opportunity to communicate with the instructor and their peers. I encourage you to ask as many questions as you would in a face-to-face class; if you are struggling with any aspect of the course, I can only help you if you ask for help.

Specific learning objectives for each lesson and assignments are detailed within each lesson. The class schedule is published in the CANVAS calendar (the course management system used for this course).

Return to top of page


Course Goals and Learning Objectives

The overarching goal of this course is to provide secondary science teachers with the necessary content background to convey the astronomy topics required by mandated state standards. You will be provided with materials for presenting the course content in your classroom and will be granted licenses to use the courseware developed for this course in your own secondary classroom.

Course-Level Learning Objectives
By the end of the course, successful students will be able to

  • critically think about principles of astronomy and astrophysics and apply them in real time;
  • describe the Earth's place in the Solar System, Galaxy, and Universe;
  • describe the scale of the Universe and the relative sizes of the different objects within the Universe;
  • explain how astronomers measure electromagnetic radiation from various sources and use that information to derive an understanding of astronomical objects and phenomena;
  • write reflectively about their learning.

Unit I, Lessons 1-3: Naked Eye Astronomy and the Foundational Physics of Astronomy
By the end of the unit, successful students will be able to

  • identify the objects visible in the night sky to the unaided eye;
  • describe the three dimensional geometry of the Earth and describe the various motions in the sky that result from Earth's rotation and orbit;
  • explain the reason that the Earth experiences seasons;
  • describe the process and appearance of eclipses and the phases of the Moon;
  • interpret the observational evidence for a heliocentric Solar System;
  • quantitatively compare and contrast the shape of the planetary orbits and the relationship between their distance from the Sun and their orbital period;
  • explain why gravity is the force that keeps planets in orbit around the Sun and describe how the orbital properties of an object can be used to determine the mass of the system;
  • describe the different types of electromagnetic radiation, from radio waves to gamma-rays;
  • explain the relationship between the temperature of an ideal radiator and the amount and type of electromagnetic radiation that it will emit;
  • identify the instruments that astronomers use to detect the light from an astronomical object, and explain how to interpret the various methods for displaying a spectrum of light from an object.

Unit II, Lessons 4-7: Stars
By the end of the unit, successful students will be able to

  • classify stars into spectral types and describe the temperatures and luminosities of stars of each type;
  • use the method of trigonometric parallax to measure the distance to a star;
  • construct a temperature-luminosity diagram for stars and explain how stars of different masses, ages, and sizes are represented in the diagram;
  • describe how the Doppler effect is used to calculate the velocity of a star from its spectrum;
  • describe the process by which stars generate energy in their cores;
  • describe the forces that keep stars in a stable equilibrium;
  • qualitatively describe the process of star formation;
  • qualitatively describe the process of evolution for both low mass and high mass stars;
  • compare and contrast the stellar remnants of high and low mass stars;
  • identify the different types of star clusters stars inhabit;
  • compare and contrast the appearance of the temperature luminosity diagrams for different star clusters;
  • describe the process by which astronomers can estimate the age of a star cluster.

Unit III, Lessons 8-10: Galaxies & Cosmology
By the end of the unit, successful students will be able to

  • explain the geometry of the Milky Way and why it appears as a band in the sky as seen from Earth;
  • identify the different stellar populations present in the Milky Way and their distribution within the Galaxy;
  • describe the evidence for a supermassive black hole in the center of the Galaxy;
  • compare and contrast the other galaxies in the Universe using the traditional tuning fork model;
  • qualitatively describe the process by which galaxies evolve;
  • compare and contrast a normal galaxy and an active galaxy;
  • describe the spatial distribution of galaxies within the Universe and the environments in which galaxies reside;
  • quantitatively relate the velocity of a galaxy and its distance using Hubble's Law;
  • describe how Hubble's Law implies an expanding Universe;
  • describe the evidence for the Big Bang as the origin of the Universe and the methods for estimating the age of the Universe;
  • describe the evidence for substantial amounts of dark matter in the Universe;
  • explain how observations of distant objects reveal the Universe is accelerating as it expands.

Unit IV, Lessons 11-12: Planets & Life in the Universe
By the end of the unit, successful students will be able to

  • compare and contrast the interior structure and atmospheres of Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars;
  • qualitatively describe the process of tidal locking and relate this phenomenon to Mercury's orbit around the Sun and the Moon's orbit around the Earth;
  • describe the role impacts and collisions had on the evolution of the Inner Solar System planets and the Moon;
  • compare and contrast the terrestrial planets and the Jovian planets;
  • describe the processes for the formation and evolution of ring systems around giant planets;
  • compare and contrast the Moons of the Jovian planets;
  • relate the appearance of the Jovian planets to atmospheric processes;
  • describe the relationship between Pluto and the Kuiper Belt;
  • explain the origin of comets and their distribution in the Solar System;
  • describe the process by which a 'shooting star' appears in the night sky;
  • qualitatively describe the process of planet formation;
  • describe the habitable zone and the likelihood for life to appear on various objects in the Solar System and in other systems;
  • describe how astronomers are searching for signals from other civilizations in the Galaxy.

Return to top of page


Required Course Materials

All instructional materials needed for this course are presented online — no textbook is required. Some students do find a textbook a nice resource, however. So if you would like to purchase one, contact me for recommendations. There is also a free online astronomy textbook that I refer to and you may wish to use; it is available at Astronomy Notes.

In order to access the online course materials, you need to have an active Penn State Access Account user ID and password. If you have any questions about obtaining or activating your Penn State Access Account, please contact the World Campus.

In addition, you will need to purchase the following software in order to complete select course assignments:

  • Starry Night Enthusiast: This is available with an education discount through Starry Night's Education Office. Mike Goodman is the direct contact at the Starry Night store, and he has arranged for our class to order the software in the following way:

Your coupon code is: PennState2017 (this is good only for students taking the course during Fall semester 2017 (code updated Aug 2017)

1. Students go to Starry Night Enthusiast.

2. Scroll to the bottom of the page and select Download as the Method of Delivery.

3. Press the Add to cart button.

4. Complete the billing address information.

5. Enter the coupon code and press Apply (this is essential or full price will be charged).

6. Price will adjust for the education discount and should be $49.95.

7. Complete the billing/credit card details.

8. Two emails will be sent to students: a receipt, a download link.

9. Click the link, enter the user name and license key.

While Starry Night Enthusiast will suffice for the purposes of this course, you might consider purchasing one of the following versions instead:

  • Order one of the Starry Night for Educators versions (Elementary, Middle, or High) - See Starry Night Education

Note:

Be sure to order Starry Night at the beginning of the course so you will have it in time for the first Starry Night activity.

If you have any questions about your order, obtaining an educator's discount, the differences between the various versions, or buying Starry Night for your school, please call Mike Goodman (Simulation Curriculum Corp.) at the number below. He is very responsive to the needs of educators.

Mike Goodman
Simulation Curriculum Corp.
Phone: 952-653-0493
Email: mgoodman@simcur.com

Return to top of page


Assignments and Grading

ASTRO 801 will rely upon a variety of methods to assess and evaluate student learning, including

  • automated online quizzes are low stakes and allow you to practice your mastery of the concepts in the lessons;
  • required participation in online discussion groups - your substantive posts on an assigned topic will allow me to gauge your progress and ability to articulate key concepts;
  • laboratory exercises using software simulations - you will investigate several different concepts by taking data, analyzing the data, and reporting your results;
  • a capstone project that will be used to evaluate your knowledge and skills through the production of a learning module that you, in turn, will be able to use to teach course concepts to your own students.

You will earn a grade that reflects the extent to which you achieve the course learning objectives listed above. Grades are assigned by the percentage of possible points earned in each lesson's activities. Below is a breakdown of each lesson's value as a percentage of the total course grade.

AssignmentPercent of Grade
Automated online quizzes: 12 total - top 10 scores will be used to calculate quiz grade40 %
Required participation in online discussion forums and completing practice problems10 %
Laboratory exercises - 430 %
Capstone Project20 %

I will use the Canvas gradebook to keep track of your grades. You can see your grades by clicking on Grades from the menu on the left side of the screen in Canvas. Overall course grades will be determined as follows. Percentages refer to the proportion of all possible points earned. This scale may be adjusted downward, if necessary, so that the distribution of letter grades includes all possible grades (that is, if the highest grade in the class is a 91%, that person will receive an A, not an A-)

Letter GradePercentages
A92 - 100 %
A-87.5 - 91.9 %
B+85 - 87.4 %
B80 - 84.9 %
B-77.5 - 79.9 %
C+75 - 77.4 %
C70 - 74.9 %
D60 - 69.9 %
F< 60 %
XUnsatisfactory (student did not participate)

Return to top of page


Astro 801 Course Schedule

Printable Schedule

Below you will find a summary of the learning activities for this course and the associated time frames. This course is 13 weeks in length, beginning with an official orientation week.

Time FrameLessonTasks
Week 1Course orientation
  • Perform tasks outlined in course orientation to become familiar with the course and the course environment.
  • Post a self-introduction to the course discussion forum.
  • Complete the course background survey. This is ungraded, and the point is to find out about you and get an idea of your comfort level with the various topics we'll cover in the course.
  • Take the course information quiz in order to gain access to the rest of the lessons and content in this course.
  • Purchase, install, and test out Starry Night software.
Week 2Lesson 1: Motions in the Sky and the 3D Geometry of the Sun, Earth, Moon System
  • Read and use Starry Night and interactive tools to study the basic behavior of the Sun, Earth, and Moon.
  • Complete a short web quiz on these topics.
  • Discuss the appearance of the Moon.
Week 3Lesson 2: Orbits and the Laws of Kepler and Newton
  • Perform practice problems using Kepler's third law.
  • Begin data collection using Moons of Jupiter simulation.
  • Complete a short web quiz on these topics.
Week 4Lesson 3: Electromagnetic radiation and Astronomical Observations
  • Complete a short web quiz on these topics.
  • Participate in a discussion about the nature of astronomical experiments.
  • Submit your Moons of Jupiter lab report.
Time FrameLessonTasks
Week 5Lesson 4: The Properties of Stars and Stellar Classification
  • Complete a short web quiz on these topics.
  • Perform practice problems to find distance and velocity of stars.
Week 6Lesson 5: The Early Stages of Stellar Evolution
  • Begin HR diagram lab exercise.
  • Complete a short web quiz on these topics.
  • Participate in a discussion about binary star evolution.
Week 7Lesson 6: The Late Stages of Stellar Evolution
  • Complete a short web quiz on these topics.
  • Participate in a discussion about black holes.
Week 8Lesson 7: Star Clusters
  • Complete a short web quiz on these topics.
  • Submit your HR diagram lab report.
Time FrameLessonTasks
Week 9Lesson 8: The Milky Way Galaxy
  • Complete a short web quiz on these topics.
  • Begin Capstone Project.
Week 10Lesson 9: Galaxies in the Universe
  • Complete a short web quiz on these topics.
  • Begin Galaxy lab exercise.
Week 11Lesson 10: Cosmology
  • Complete a short web quiz on these topics.
  • Participate in a discussion about the Big Bang.
  • Submit Galaxy lab report.
Time FrameLessonTasks
Week 12Lesson 11: The Solar System
  • Complete a short web quiz on these topics.
  • Begin Extrasolar planets lab.
Week 13Lesson 12: Life in the Universe
  • Complete a short web quiz on these topics.
  • Submit Extrasolar planets lab report.
  • Participate in a discussion about near Earth objects.
  • Submit Capstone Project.

Return to top of page


Tips for Success in ASTRO 801

  • Participate
    In order to make the most of this opportunity, you will need to be actively involved in this course. I think you will find that your discussions with me and with your peers will be as important to your learning as your study of the material presented in the lessons and activities. Discussions offer you the opportunity to organize your thoughts about the astronomy content under discussion, present a logical argument about the topic, and give and receive feedback.
  • Do the work on time
    I see my role in this course as lead facilitator; that is, it is my job to help you achieve your educational objectives. I set deadlines to keep everyone on track to reach those goals. I think that if you do your best to adhere to those deadlines, by, for example, setting up a routine schedule when you work on the course, you will succeed. I do not see deadlines as absolute, though, and am willing to allow students flexibility to submit work late if it is necessary and if I am informed of the reason. If you miss work and you do not inform me until long after the fact, I am unlikely to be lenient, but if I know you will be turning work in late and the reason, I am likely to be lenient. Of course, I also realize emergencies arise that do not present the opportunity to inform me ahead of time, and will make allowances for those situations, as needed.
  • Be professional
    This is a graduate level class, and so I will assume that everyone in the class is an adult and will behave with integrity. I expect that you will not lie or cheat and that you will adhere to all of Penn State's Eberly College of Science policies on academic integrity.

Return to top of page

Course Policies

Sentence to Paragraph Writing: Ages 11 to 14 – Lauren Brooks

Sentence to Paragraph Writing is a fundamental approach, which starts with composing well-written, basic sentences, and then quickly moves to developing a single-paragraph paper and ends the year with two-paragraph papers. The class will begin with improving sentence structure by applying basic grammar and figures of speech. This emphasis is continued as the student learns the organizational process of brainstorming, outlining, rough draft, and editing, resulting in a well-written paragraph. To determine readiness for this class, contact Lauren Brooks at laurenbrooksclasses [at] gmail [dot] com or 281-507-2403.

-Supplies:

*Worksheets: You will need to purchase the $20 worksheets directly from The Write Foundation (www.thewritefoundation.org), and wait for them to be shipped to your home. 

*Other supplies: The student will also need a large 3-ring binder (2 – 3 inch), 6+ hi-liters (blue, yellow, green, orange, purple, pink), eight (8) notebook divider tabs, and a thesaurus.

-Requirements: Homework must be typed. While this is not a literature course, a reading list will be provided either to be read independently or as a family. There will be no tests on the books.

-Expectations: Class time will be 1 hour and 30 minutes per week. Allow approximately two (2) hours per week of study time. 

-Payments: There will be 10 payments of $45/each for the class.

    *Make all checks payable to Lauren Brooks

    *Mail registration and payments to Lauren Brooks, 9614 Dornoch Drive, Spring, Texas 77379·        

-Contact: laurenbrooksclasses [at] gmail [dot] com - 281-507-2403

Paragraph Writing: Ages 12 to 16 – Lauren Brooks

Paragraph Writing is a fundamental approach, which covers writing a single paragraph paper to an introduction of a 5-paragraph essay. The class will work on organizational skills such as note taking, brainstorming, outlines, rough drafts, and editing. To determine readiness for this class, contact Lauren Brooks at laurenbrooksclasses [at] gmail [dot] com or 281-507-2403.

-Supplies:

*Worksheets: You will need to purchase the $20 worksheets directly from The Write Foundation (www.thewritefoundation.org), and wait for them to be shipped to your home. 

*Other supplies: The student will also need a large 3-ring binder (2 – 3 inch), 6+ hi-liters (blue, yellow, green, orange, purple, pink), eight (8) notebook divider tabs, and a thesaurus.

-Requirements: Homework must be typed. While this is not a literature course, a reading list will be provided either to be read independently or as a family. There will be no tests on the books.

-Expectations: Class time will be 1 hour and 45 minutes per week. Allow approximately four hours per week of study time. 

-Payments: There will be 10 payments of $50/each for the class.

     *Make all checks payable to Lauren Brooks

     *Mail registration and payments to Lauren Brooks, 9614 Dornoch Drive, Spring,Texas 77379·        

-Contact: laurenbrooksclasses [at] gmail [dot] com - 281-507-2403

Essay Writing: Ages 13 to 18 – Lauren Brooks

Essay Writing is a fundamental approach covering 5 and 6-paragraph essays, a 7 to 9-paragraph research paper, a group project paper, timed essays, and poetry. The class will review and strengthen organizational skills, such as note taking, brainstorming, outlines, rough drafts, editing, and logical reasoning. To determine readiness for this class, contact Lauren Brooks at laurenbrooksclasses [at] gmail [dot] com or 281-507-2403. The Write Foundation Paragraph Writing curriculum (in class or at home) is a prerequisite for this class. Anyone who has not taken Paragraph Writing is required to get special permission from the teacher before registering for this class.

-Supplies:

*Worksheets: You will need to purchase the $20 worksheets directly from The Write Foundation (www.thewritefoundation.org), and wait for them to be shipped to your home. 

*Other supplies: The student will also need a large 3-ring binder (2 – 3 inch), 6+ hi-liters (blue, yellow, green, orange, purple, pink), eight (8) notebook divider tabs, and a thesaurus.

-Requirements: Homework must be typed. While this is not a literature course, a reading list will be provided either to be read independently or as a family. There will be no tests on the books.

-Expectations: Class time will be 1 hour and 45 minutes per week. Allow approximately four to six hours per week of study time.

-Payments: There will be 10 payments of $50/each for the class.

    *Make all checks payable to Lauren Brooks

    *Mail registration and payments to Lauren Brooks, 9614 Dornoch Drive, Spring, Texas 77379·        

-Contact: laurenbrooksclasses [at] gmail [dot] com - 281-507- 2403

      

The Bridge Writing: Literature and Composition – Year 1 - Grades: 9-12 Dianna de Valle

In the literature portion of this course, students will be reading stories from an American Literature Sampler and a British Literature Sampler to acquaint them with the richness of the written word.  We will study works from various genres and classify works according to their literary time periods. Critical reading comprehension skills will be learned and practiced as we work to read “between the lines” in an effort to understand not only what was said, but what was meant by the author.  Students will be taught how to identify structural elements such as theme, plot, conflicts, setting, and character types.  Other important literary analysis aspects such as tone, imagery, and symbolism will be mastered along with identification of simile, metaphor, personification, and much more.

Writing instruction will begin with students being introduced to and taught the 10 step writing process. The first semester focuses on the technical aspects of writing as students acquire and engage the necessary skills for writing persuasive, narrative, and compare/contrast essays.  The second semester will explore various fun and imaginative writing processes and activities to help with the more creative side of writing.  During the second semester students will also be taught the incremental development process for writing an MLA format research paper including topic, thesis, research and outline development. This class also has a fair amount of SAT prep work such as prompted timed writings, analogy practice and vocabulary enrichment.  In an effort to keep the student’s grammar skills sharp, we have a daily grammar review.

The main goal of this class is to foster a love and understanding for literature and writing within the student by giving them the necessary tools and instruction.  There will be 10 payments of $55 each for the class.  The curriculum will be provided by the teacher for a one-time rental fee of $55. You may send completed registration form and first month’s tuition to Dianna de Valle, 22090 Bryantwood Ct. Hockley, TX 77447.  You may contact Dianna by email at devalleo [at] aol [dot] com or call her at 281-798-7715.

The Bridge Writing: Literature and Composition -- Year 2 Grades: 10-12 Dianna de Valle

The literature portion of this course engages the student in careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature from various genres and periods ranging from the fifteenth to the twenty-first century. Through the close reading of selected texts, the student will deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure to their readers.  As the student reads, they will consider a work’s structure, style, and theme, as well as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone.  The student will be introduced to the art of reading deliberately and thoroughly, taking time to understand a work’s complexity, to absorb its richness of meaning, and to fully comprehend how that meaning is embodied in literary form. 

Using a 10 step writing process, students will write to understand a literary work, but will also engage in free writing and creative writing.  We will also learn and practice many different patterns of development for essays such as descriptive, persuasive, compare/contrast, illustrative, narrative, process analysis and more.  This class also has a fair amount of SAT prep work such as prompted timed writings, analogy practice and vocabulary enrichment.  In an effort to keep the student’s grammar skills sharp, we have a daily grammar review.

The main goal of this class is to prepare the student for college level literature and writing.  Although not required, students will be prepared to take the AP Literature and Composition Exam and/or the CLEP Exam at the end of the year, which gives them the opportunity to earn 3-6 hours of college level English credits.  The curriculum will be provided by the teacher for a one-time rental charge of $60. There will be 10 payments of $60.00 each for the class.  You may send completed registration form and first month’s tuition to Dianna de Valle, 22090 Bryantwood Ct.  Hockley, TX 77447.  You may contact Dianna by email at devalleo [at] aol [dot] or call her at 281-798-7715.

Creating Sentences (Tuesday) –Kimberly King

Creating Sentences is a pre-paragraph writing level for students that are ages 9 – 12 who struggle to correctly write sentences that make sense and actually tell you something. Students study basic grammar as they learn how to incorporate common figures and parts of speech to develop complex descriptive sentences that are not run-on sentences or fragments. Common writing errors such as when are nouns proper, misused homonyms, apostrophe confusion, and awkward sentences are covered to prepare students for formal paragraph writing. Creative poetry writing and educational games are used to develop and strengthen basic grammar and writing skills. Creating Sentences is the entry level for The Write Foundation writing curriculum.

o Supplies:

*Worksheets: You will need to purchase the $20 worksheets directly from The Write Foundation (www.thewritefoundation.org), and wait for them to be shipped to your home. 

*Other supplies: The student will also need two (2) self-addressed stamped envelopes, a 3-ring binder (2 – 3 inch), 6+ hi-liters (blue, yellow, green, orange, purple, pink), eight (8) notebook divider tabs, a dictionary and a thesaurus.

o Requirements: Homework must be typed. While this is not a literature course, a reading list will be provided either to be read independently or as a family. There will be no tests on the books.

o Expectations: Class time will be 1 hour and 30 minutes per week. Allow approximately two (2) hours per week of study time. 

o Payments: There will be 10 payments of $45/each for the class.  One time supply fee of $35 and a building use fee of $30 per semester.

*Make all checks payable to Kimberly King

*Mail registration and payments to Kimberly King, 19206 Paradise Summit, Tomball, TX  77377 

o Contact: kimking0121 [at] icloud [dot] com – 281-750-6509

 

Creating Sentences(Thursday) Devin Gott

This course is designed for students aged 9 – 12 and will prepare them for formal paragraph writing. To determine readiness for this class contact Devin Gott at devin.a.gott [at] gmail [dot] com Lessons will discuss common writing errors, sentences structure and construction, and figures of speech. There will be a complementary Reading List which will count as extra credit towards homework.

You will need to purchase the Creating Sentences Worksheets from The Writing Foundation for $20 (https://thewritefoundation.org/order-worksheets/).  Students will need two (2) self-addressed stamped envelopes, a 3-ring binder (2 – 3 inch), 6+ hi-liters (blue, yellow, green, orange, purple, pink), eight (8) notebook divider tabs, and a thesaurus.  Tuition is $45 for 10 months.  Completed registration form and first month's tuition and supply fee check should be mailed to Devin Gott, 2451 Lake Rd #711, Huntsville, TX 77340. Contact: Devin Gott at: devin.a.gott [at] gmail [dot] com or 281-216-1668.

0 comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *